PracticeLink Magazine

Summer 2017

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

Issue link: http://magazine.practicelink.com/i/826953

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30  S u MM e R 2017 PracticeLink.com department s Job Doctor Top 5 Physician Interview Mistakes Interviewing doesn't have to be so nerve-wracking. Avoid these five mistakes and you have no need to fret. MATT WIGGINS E M plo YM e N t IN te RVI e WS AR e t H e CA u S e of much angst among the physician community at large. Upon scheduling an interview, you may start envisioning yourself sitting across from much more experienced and potentially jaded physicians, business professionals looking to sniff out a bad investment, or HR assassins trained to pick apart your flaws to ensure they don't let a weak link through the doors of the hospital. Though this fear is a bit far-fetched, it's surprisingly common. The truth is, you can't control how the interviewers handle the interview, and thus shouldn't worry about it. You can only control how you handle an interview, and the key to handling it well is to prepare thoroughly and avoid these common mistakes. MISTAKE #1: ONE AND DONE Many physicians, especially those just finishing training, have in their minds an ideal scenario for practicing medicine. They have preconditions and preconceptions about where and how they want to work. Having such ideas may lead you to interview with only one employer, but this is a huge mistake. Most physicians are not master poker players, and eventually an employer will realize you are only interviewing with them. When this happens, you can forget negotiating for better income, v a c a t io n , c a l l s c h e d u l e , bonuses or really anything else. If they're your only interview, they hold all the cards: You have nothing to compare them to and lots of motivation to take their offer. At any stage of your career, having multiple interviews ensures you will be able to evaluate factors you may never have thought of. You can use pros from each opportunity to make the others better and negotiate from a position of strength and opportunity rather than weakness and dependence. MISTAKE #2: FAILURE TO PREPARE You would never take your boards without preparing. You would never invest your money without researching You would never propose marriage without some sort of knowledge of the person and some plans in place. The same should be said for interviewing.

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