PracticeLink Magazine

Summer 2017

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

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the INTERVIEW issue PracticeLink.com S u MM e R 2017 57 you feel welcomed and wanted," says Webber, and that's especially true of your potential workplace. "You're going to spend a lot of time here with these people, so make sure you'll feel comfortable before you choose to relocate," she says. A visit is also the best way to learn about the community where you hope to live. "Learn about the schools, about a ny work opportunities for your spouse if he or she will also be looking for a position, and seek out information about any cultural or recreational activities that you and your family enjoy," says Hinds. And just because you have lived in the area before doesn't mean you can skip this step, says Ron Davis, senior vice president of MD Preferred Services, a website that helps physicians find professionals l i ke rea ltors, at tor neys a nd accountants. "Even if you lived or grew up there, unless you've made recent trips back to the area, don't assume the place you left will look the same." As he points out, training can take a while, and if you've added a fellowship on top of that, chances are the place has changed. "You need to visit it again if you haven't seen it in a while," he says. Y i n g H u i L o w, M . D . , a n a nesthesiolog ist who recently moved from North Carolina where she trained to Lebanon, New Hampshire, suggests bringing along the important people in your life to visit a new location. "You want people to visit you, so it lets them become comfortable with the area, too," she says. 3  ESTABLISH A TIMELINE Relocating involves a lot of moving parts happening simultaneously. Once you have the move scheduled on your calendar, you'll need to establish a timeline so the transition will be smooth. "One of the first things to do is apply for your state license," says Alexander Zaslavsky, M.D., who relocated from a hospitalist job in New York City to a new position in Maryland — then, when his employer opened a new location in New Jersey, he moved again. "The licensure Alexander Zaslavsky, M.D., recommends applying for a license in your new state as soon as a relocation is in your future. It's a process that "can take up to four months or longer," he says. "Start early." · Photo by J pg Photography See this issue's physicians in exclusive video interviews at Facebook.com/PracticeLink

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