PracticeLink Magazine

Summer 2017

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

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features 62  S u MM e R 2017 PracticeLink.com and even the costs of living in the new location," he says. 6  MAKE YOUR MOVE Now that you've visited the area, established where you'll live, seen to your paperwork and any childcare needs, it's time for the move itself. Low said the move, for her, was easy. "I didn't have any furniture or big items to move." But for many, a move can be stressful. "Changing location is listed as one of life's biggest stress factors," says Webber. "Hiring experts can help." She suggests you talk to your employer 's hu m a n resou rces department and ask for referrals. Hinds agrees: "Most hospitals have realtor partners they work with and can recommend," he says. Phairas adds that office and group practice managers can also refer you to realtors, movers and other experts in the area. Young, however, took a more self-directed approach: "I Googled realtors in the area," she says. And Tsai credits his wife for taking on most of the house-hunting chores. For Zaslavsky, "My wife and I were a team. We looked at homes together." "Most physicians are experts in their field, but novices when it comes to relocating," Davis says. "And health care is way behind corporate America in successfully relocating people." Hospitals can only do so much. "They may refer you to a realtor and tell you where to get three bids for movers, then you're on your own," he says. But relocating involves much more. "A consultant or relocating company can bundle services like mortgage contacts, financial advisors and attorneys," he says. Will you be reimbursed for your relocation expenses? It depends on the employer and the location. Hertzler says employers generally help relocating physicians by putting together a benefit package that will ease moving costs. Whether that's a signing bonus or a stipend depends on each situation. Tsai says his employer did not help him with moving expenses. "But our company does offer a loan to assist with the move or it sometimes offers a signing bonus," he says. A typical amount of the loan or bonus is $10,000 —which seems to be the going rate for relocation expenses when they are offered, adds Hinds. Says Webber: "You never know whether or not you'll be reimbursed unless you ask." 7  GET SETTLED By now, you've found a home, unpacked your boxes, and are starting to know your way around the hospital and maybe around your new community as well. But don't stop there. "This is the time to network," says Phairas. Go to hospital meetings to meet your colleagues, and to medical and specialty society meetings to meet other physicians in the area, she says. These physicians can become friends or referrals, and they can also let you know about restaurants, parks, hiking trails and other things to do in the community in your area of interest, or maybe those of your spouse or children. " Ne t w o rk i n g i s i m p o r t a n t , and not just from a business perspective," she says. Hertzler says Patient First often arranges a dinner where relocating physicians can meet with other physicians from the local Patient First urgent care centers. "It's a time to meet colleagues and their families, and to learn more about the workplace and the area," she says. It's also important at this time to keep the happiness of your family in mind. You may be delighted with the new location and job, but if your spouse or children are having a miserable time of it, you may have to re-assess your priorities. "Relocating can be a real culture shock for children," says Davis. "It's why your family's needs and feelings must be considered before you actually make the move." Young says she gave herself a timeline. "I told myself and I told my family that we'll give the location and the job two years. If after that time we weren't happy, we'd move back. I think it's really important to have an exit strategy like that, an escape route," she says. Even more essential, however, is taking time to decide if the move is right for you. "Before you move, you have to sit down and ask yourself why you're making this move," she says. "If you're not sure why you've put yourself and your family through this, it's not likely to work." But you can't let fear of the unknown and the occasional unpleasantness stop you either. "Don't be afraid to relocate," says Young. "There's no advancement without risk. You'll become a better person for it." ● Win! Find your next practice— and enter to win a $500 gift card—at PracticeLink.com/Win

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