PracticeLink Magazine

Summer 2017

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

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features 66  summer 2017 PracticeLink.com If you need more direction or are interested in a more formal assessment, there are many personality assessment tools available. One is the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, based on the work of psychiatrist Carl Jung and co- creators Katharine Briggs, and Isabel Briggs Myers. This popular tool evaluates personality based on the following four areas: • Extraversion or introversion: whether you prefer to spend time in the outer world or your inner world • Sensing or intuition: whether you like to focus on information gathered through your senses or apply your own interpretation and meaning to the information you receive • Thinking or feeling: whether you prefer to deal with principles and facts or people and circumstances when coming to a decision • Judging or perceiving: whether your goal is to reach a decision or explore information and options Another popular assessment is the Big Five personality traits, developed by several different researchers over many years, starting with D. w . Fiske in 1949 and continuing through Robert McCrae and Paul Costa as recently as 1987. This theory focuses on five general areas, sometimes referred to with the acronym o C ean : • Openness: characteristics such as imagination, insight, and abstract thinking • Conscientiousness: your propensity for organization, attention to detail, impulse control and goal-directed behaviors • Extraversion: whether you gain or expend energy in social situations • Agreeableness: your levels of cooperation and competitiveness among others • Neuroticism: your emotional resiliency and stability Once you've assessed your personal style — whether formally or informally — consider p Active listening is a helpful interview skill. "People are willing to tell you what you need to know, if you give them the opportunity," says William Silber, m .D. · Photo by David Ochoa See this issue's physicians in exclusive video interviews at Facebook.com/ PracticeLink

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