PracticeLink Magazine

Summer 2017

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

Issue link: http://magazine.practicelink.com/i/826953

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 68 of 87

the INTERVIEW issue PracticeLink.com summer 2017 69 DO YOU ALWAYS DO YOUR HOMEWORK? Research and preparation are second nature to some people, while others proudly tout their proven ability to wing it. Whichever has been your standard method of operation, experts agree that prep time is essential prior to an interview. C h r i s t o p h e r E w i n g , m . D . , emergency medicine physician at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire, always goes into an interview armed with knowledge. "I learned in residency that you really have to understand the people, environment and culture of a place," he says. "Ahead of time, get the interview agenda to find out who you'll meet and look up the names of people on LinkedIn and staff bios. This helps you anticipate the needs of the people you'll be meeting." In addition to learning the who's who of people you're meeting, delve into the company— read about their strategic partners, special interests, planned growth or future direction and values. Look for both things that attract you and things you question. Ewing recalls one interview where he used a potential concern to raise questions and generate a useful conversation. "I used this as an opportunity to ask questions to learn about their process and think of ways to improve it," he recalls. Your research can also provide you with topics for side conversations. Make note of similar backgrounds, shared alma maters or mutual acquaintances, and pull these out when there's a lag in conversation. ARE YOU A PERPETUAL PLEASER? Do you often agree to things you don't really want to do? Are you more likely to smile and nod politely than stir up controversy? Focusing too hard on trying to please can thwart progress in an interview. It doesn't support a meaningful exchange of information and risks leaving your interviewers with a vague or false impression of you. "Don't put on a front and tell us what you think we want to hear. Answer honestly, even in situations where you think it's not what we want to hear," says Justin Sharpe, in-house physician recruiter at Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare in Florida. "For example, don't be afraid to say, 'This isn't my first choice, but…,' and then go on to tell us why you're here, what ended up bringing you out." Experts suggest initiating further conversation, rather than quickly accepting, when something doesn't quite mesh with your goals. Ask the speaker to elaborate, suggest a comprom ise or present a n alternative. Your probing could result in a scenario that works better for both of you. p Malika Fair, m .D., m .P. h ., identified a key question she wanted answered during the interview process. Prioritize your questions so those most important to you are answered first.

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of PracticeLink Magazine - Summer 2017