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How to research a company in your job search

 

Finding long-term happiness in a job can start with how well you research employers during the job search. Think about an escape room. The ultimate goal to is free yourself before time runs out, but solving the puzzle involves more than finding a single key to unlock the door. It involves multiple components, and the solution is only obtained by learning several individual insights that lead to the right answer. Unlocking the mystery of where you’ll enjoy practicing medicine also requires finding the right information. As you start your job search, take note of these six aspects of compa....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Drew Terry Drew Terry
 

Generalist vs. specialist: which are you?

 

Do you see yourself as someone who excels in the details within a single area, or do you prefer to know a little about a lot of subjects? How you answered this question might align with your path as a health care worker.    When it comes to specialists and generalists, there are distinctions; however, one skill set isn’t necessarily stronger than the other. The two simply differ based on the depth and breadth. If you’re a specialist, you have deepened expertise in a specific area. If you’re a generalist, you have broader expertise in multiple areas. You’re lik....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

The benefits of peer mentoring

 

Have you ever been a part of a mentoring program? Perhaps you’ve sought advice or guidance from another student or friend during training. Maybe you’ve tutored someone or served as an adviser. Having a mentor is a great way to learn from someone with experience, and being a mentor is a great way to share your knowledge and gain a new perspective as you teach those who look to learn from you. What is peer mentoring? Peer mentoring is a one-on-one relationship that occurs between someone with specific experience and knowledge and someone who is new to the field or industry. It is mos....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Megan Trippi Megan Trippi
 

Physician job search preparation: A year in review

 

2020 was the year of unprecedented times. 2021 became all about uncertainty. Many sought a return to normal - or near normal - as treatments and vaccines emerged. The physician job search was no different. However, fluctuating caseloads and continued precautions and restrictions led to a state of limbo with each activity. Some job interviews and other activities continued in person, while others shifted to virtual. Through it all, health care facilities sought physicians for their opportunities - and job-seeking physicians continued researching ways to stand out among other candidates. P....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Drew Terry Drew Terry
 

New Year’s Resolutions (Priorities) for Physicians

 

Resolutions can feel helpful when kicking off the new year; they often provide a sense of purpose and can help us pin down our goals. But they can also be a lot of pressure. And the truth is, most people don’t stick with their New Year’s resolutions more than three months after they’ve been set. But what if the pressure of resolutions could be replaced with the growth potential of priorities? And instead of focusing on a single, measurable result, the focus was establishing a more permanent mental framework that enables you to be the person and provider you want to become? As....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

Steps to account for when switching positions

 

There are often two reasons a physician will switch positions. The first is that a recruiter or hiring employer has reached out to make a case for their opportunity - and it was compelling. The second reason is that it’s time for a change - whether to the present work culture, to practice in another geographical location or something else. Regardless, if you’re about to make a transition to a new position at a new facility, there are some details you’ll want to account for and steps you’ll want to take to ensure it’s as smooth as possible. Read the fine pri....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

Staving off physician burnout in 2022

 

When planning for the future, being a physician is usually a stable, rewarding career. But if you feel more like a machine and less like the physician you planned on becoming, you may be suffering from physician burnout.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the overall employment of physicians and surgeons is projected to grow 3% from 2020 to 2030, which is still slower than the average for all occupations. Despite limited employment growth, an average of 22,700 openings for physicians and surgeons are projected each year over the next decade. Most of those openings are expected ....

 

Read PracticeLink articles from Michele Gutermuth. Michele Gutermuth
 

8 things to do before a virtual career fair

 

There are a lot of perks to attending a virtual career fair. Not only do they allow you to find opportunities anywhere you can set up your laptop, but they also save you the time and effort it often costs to travel and attend. Plus, they put you a step closer to finding your next career move. See PracticeLink’s upcoming virtual career fairs - free for physicians and advanced practice providers But just because a networking event is online doesn’t mean it won’t require some preparation. Like a career fair you’d attend in person, the "before" can be just as important as....

 

Alexandra Cappetta
 

How to know the average physician salary by specialty

 

After devoting years and dollars to training and specializing, physicians are often greeted by lucrative opportunities upon completion of residency or fellowship. Just how much you’ll make, though, depends on a number of factors. Salary will differ greatly by specialty. Other influences may include location, experience and how tight the job market is. Of course, base salary can’t be the only deciding factor in a job search. When comparing offers, you’ll want to be sure you understand  the base salary vs. total compensation. Plus, what you’ll earn is only part of ch....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Drew Terry Drew Terry
 

Gratitude: The often-overlooked game changer

 

During particularly difficult or stressful times, expressing gratitude doesn’t always come naturally. When bouts of burnout or depressed moods hit (because sometimes they do!), it may require more of a conscious choice to pivot toward a spirit of thankfulness. But here’s why that choice is worth it: Psychology research from Harvard Health shows expressing gratitude "helps people feel more positive emotions, relish good experiences, improve their health, deal with adversity, and build strong relationships." Seems pretty significant, right? Let’s take a look at some findings an....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

What to do when you’re close to an offer

 

You’ve completed your training and now it’s time to take the next step in your medical career. Even in your extensive education, you may not have learned what to do in your job search, how to interpret a contract or what the interview and offer process look like. Here are tips to help as you approach the offer stage of your interview process: Start early The ideal scenario for physicians is to be close to signing an offer six months prior to the end of residency, so you should begin looking for jobs one to two years before completion of your training. When you wait to apply and sta....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Megan Trippi Megan Trippi
 

6 tips for a professional digital footprint

 

If you searched for yourself online, what would you find? Your personal search results are your digital footprint, the collection of your activities, actions and contributions that can be found on the Internet. There are two types of digital footprints: passive and active. Passive footprints are the ones you leave involuntarily, like your browser history and the use of apps with geolocations. Active footprints, on the other hand, include the information you share voluntarily, from blog posts and images to social media activity. Like it or not, most employers use social media to help screen can....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Drew Terry Drew Terry
 

5 ways a contract attorney can help you

 

When it comes to physician contracts, two things are certain: 1. There are a lot of details to cover, and 2. They’re all relevant. Reviewing and negotiating your employment contract is one of the last hurdles before taking the next step in your career and starting your new position. During this leg of your journey, you might be wondering if it’s worth it to have your contract reviewed by an attorney (spoiler alert: It is!). Here are five reasons why you should get an attorney:     They’re experts of detail Becoming a physician or advanced practitioner takes a l....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

New PracticeLink webinars can help physicians save on student loans

 

Being a physician is amazing. Dealing with student loans is not. PracticeLink and physician student loan expert Joy Sorensen Navarre want to change that with a series of four webinars dedicated to student loans. You’ll learn why these loans are so confusing, how you can navigate the puzzle and how to save thousands on your student loans with help from Joy, President of Navigate Student Loans. In just seven years, Navigate is on track to save physicians $280,839,880 on student loans. Also, you’ll get an update on the Biden Administration’s changes to student loans and the oppo....

 

Learn how to save money on your student loans. Navigate
 

Be sure to get answers to these 4 compensation questions

 

Lots of factors go into determining how physicians get paid - and how much. There’s the size and established compensation structure of a given organization. The type of practice can be a factor, along with whether it’s rural or urban. And of course there’s physician experience and expected responsibilities to consider. As you search and interview for your first or next practice, salary isn’t the topic with which you want to start a conversation, but it is an important one to have. When that time comes, here are four questions you’ll want to get answered to help ....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Drew Terry Drew Terry
 

When to start the physician job search

 

Like many education and career paths, you may have followed a timeline to apply for undergraduate school, medical school, residency and fellowship. When looking for your practice, there is also a timeline, and it’s important to know when to start your search. According to the first step of First Practice, you should start casually looking at job openings 12 to 24 months before your projected practice start date. This will help you get a feel for the market in your specialty and desired location. Starting that far in advance also gives you enough time to prepare yourself; get a better ide....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Megan Trippi Megan Trippi
 

Relocation 101 – How will the practice type suit you?

 

As you explore full-time opportunities and prepare to potentially relocate, you may consider details like location. You might also research what to expect and what you’ll need in relocation assistance. As you continue preparing for your career change, take time to revisit how your future practice setting will impact your experience, such as how the facility is run, how much flexibility you’ll have as a provider, your lifestyle and the organization’s culture and vision. Common practice types Early in your job search, one of your starting points may be narrowing your selection....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

Relocation 101: How to decide where to live and practice

 

Several factors go into deciding where to practice. There’s which organizations offer an impressive compensation package and sufficient relocation assistance, and you also have to factor in the type of practice that may be your best fit.  Of course, it also simply means: "Where will I be happiest to live and practice?" It’s an obvious question to ask. Answering it, though - and feeling confident in that answer - takes contemplation, research, and discussions with those close to you. Here are five questions to ask as you evaluate where you’d like to live and practice:....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Drew Terry Drew Terry
 

Relocation 101: What kind of assistance can I anticipate?

 

Relocation is more than a career change; it can be a lifestyle adjustment. When making the decision to start practicing at a facility in a new community, it helps to have the support of those welcoming you to the area. In this three-part relocation series, we’ll be covering the must-knows about relocation, what kind of assistance you can expect, lifestyle considerations and how practice type makes a difference. First, let’s start with some relocation basics and the assistance you can expect to receive from your new employers. Forms of assistance While a relocation package or reloca....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

10 salary negotiation tips

 

You’re probably not used to going to the movies to brush up on your negotiation skills, but it may not be the wrong place to go if you’re looking to improve in this area. I’m not saying you should use negotiation styles from "The Negotiator," "Wall Street" or "Erin Brockovich," but media outside your daily routine and studies can inspire unique ideas, including ways to hone how you negotiate. If movies are not up your alley, you could read a book such as by Chris Voss.  Before signing on the dotted line remember: Do not try to negotiate the language in you....

 

Read PracticeLink articles from Michele Gutermuth. Michele Gutermuth
 

Ways to prepare for successful onboarding

 

When done well, the onboarding process can set a positive tone for your entire employee experience at a new organization. Just like every individual, each organization is different and will have a unique plan in place to welcome you into their community. Regardless, there are a few things you can do to prepare and set yourself up for a successful onboarding process.    Ask all the questions From the day you accept the offer, it’s likely you’ll begin to receive a lot of information about next steps. This will include paperwork and information on relocation assistance and o....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

3 things to know before a site visit

 

Your job search has many components, and it may seem intimidating at first. But then you meet a recruiter you trust, you feel good about the position and the organization, and you’re moving smoothly through the interview process. Before you know it, you’re invited for a site visit.  This will give you a chance to meet the recruiter with whom you’ve been speaking and exchanging calls and emails, connect with potential colleagues, get a better feel for the position you might accept and tour the facility. You should leave your site visit with a good idea of if the opportuni....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Megan Trippi Megan Trippi
 

What is ‘work-life balance’ to your prospective employer?

 

Everyone has a concept of what work-life balance is to them. And everyone’s concept is a little different. That includes physicians looking for their next practice and hiring organizations looking to fill their openings.   Have you considered whether your definition of is the same as the organization you’re considering? Here are five questions to ask to help determine if they’re a good fit for you and your family:   How would you describe the work environment? Are the physicians primarily dedicated to the practice of medicine only, or are they devoted to the practi....

 

Read PracticeLink articles from Michele Gutermuth. Michele Gutermuth
 

Job search advice from physicians to residents

 

Over the years, PracticeLink has had the privilege of hearing from countless physicians about their training, job search and careers.   Their paths to becoming a physician differ. Many have found unique ways to apply their skills. But all their journeys provide insights into the world of medical practice and how to find the best fit.   One topic that is often covered in these conversations is, "What’s your advice for residents who are beginning their job search?" Below are a few aspects physicians considered most important to keep in mind:   Radhames Ramos De Oleo, MD, MPH....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Drew Terry Drew Terry
 

Getting started on your CV

 

Searching for a job can seem overwhelming enough, and before you get too far into your search, you need to have an appealing, organized curriculum vitae. Your CV should paint a clear picture of your work experience, credentials and training. But how do you begin? Websites like Physician CV provide sample CVs and templates to help you get started and know what to include. You can also learn more about CVs and resources in the second step of First Practice: Write Your CV, which includes information from the PracticeLink Magazine article "CV Essentials." According to the article, you want to inco....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Megan Trippi Megan Trippi
 

How do you relieve stress?

 

Self-care. It’s more than the occasional bubble bath and unwinding with your favorite Netflix show. Sure, that can be part of it, but for more lasting wellness, it must be an active decision to give yourself the time and opportunities you need to be your best. As a provider, you know mental and physical wellness hinges on how we look after ourselves and uphold healthy habits. If you’ve been noticing a spike in your stress levels and need to re-center, consider these ways you can give yourself the attention you need and deserve: Find ways to get moving Making rounds and working in a....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

The benefits of a physician career path

 

Doctors and health care professionals will always be in demand. Of course, trends like oversupply or shortages fluctuate but as a health care provider, there will always be a need for your services. According to the College Foundation of North Carolina, registered nurses and medical professionals break the top of the list for those who are most in demand and highest paid. But let’s face it: Medical school and working through residency and fellowship training can be a costly time in a physician or advanced practice provider’s career journey. However, another benefit of working in a ....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

Moonlighting: Physicians in the driver’s seat

 

The old way of thinking is that moonlighting was done when you wanted to change direction or try out a new employer. In 2021, moonlighting during residency is common and sometimes necessary to keep up with the staffing demands because of the primary care physician shortage.    I know some physicians reading this might immediately say they are not interested in moonlighting, but I would caution you not to say no quickly. Even if your interest isn’t moonlighting full time or regularly, having yourself available in an emergency for a hospital can provide you with many benefits - ....

 

Read PracticeLink articles from Michele Gutermuth. Michele Gutermuth
 

How to get noticed by recruiters

 

If your goal is to catch recruiters’ attention and be a top contender for opportunities, you’ll want to meet them halfway during your job search and their candidate search. The two most effective ways to do this are to put yourself where hiring employers are looking, and to initiate a connection by making the first move. Here are some ways to ensure you and your information can be found in the right place at the right time and methods to reach out to the recruiters you want to notice you: Place yourself where hiring employers look: Create a candidate profile When you create a free....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

Distinguish yourself through knowledge sharing

 

The world of medicine is constantly changing and evolving, which requires physicians and advanced practice providers to stay up to date and knowledgeable about their practice and specialty. One way to do that - and distinguish yourself from other physicians -  is through researching and writing content for other physicians. Getting started Regardless of whether you want to make a career out of writing medical content or just want some experience, there are a few ways to get started: Social media - Practice creating original content by commenting on articles and peers’ posts an....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Megan Trippi Megan Trippi
 

Why you should prioritize asking questions during an interview

 

When you think about preparing for an interview, your mind probably goes directly to thinking about how you’ll answer the questions. But how much thought do you give to the questions ask? The job interview process is a two-way street. Yes, organizations use it to research, vet and identify the best possible talent to hire into their teams, but it’s also the opportunity for you to research, vet and identify how well an organization fits with your idea of the perfect practice. Being an inquisitive candidate comes with several positives.   It displays a sincere interest in the po....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Drew Terry Drew Terry
 

Master how to follow up after a job interview

 

Whether you walk out of a job interview giddy with confidence or with the sinking feeling that things didn’t go as planned, there’s one last step that’s always worth your while. Following up is key to keeping a connection with prospective employers and showing your continued interest as a candidate. So, when it comes time to touch base, how should you go about it? Here are some pointers for how to follow up on a job interview: Take your time You want to appear eager and show your gratitude to the individual who took time to meet with you but be aware that there are most like....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

The differences between your CV and resume

 

When it comes to finding a physician job, many opportunities will most likely require a CV. You’re probably familiar with the term and have an idea of what your CV should look like, but do you know how it differs from a standard resume? Resumes give information about education and work history and can also include career objectives and a summary statement. The most common resumes will provide contact details, an introduction, education, work history and relevant skills. In order to provide a prospective employer a snapshot of your experience and skills, a resume should be kept to about a....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Megan Trippi Megan Trippi
 

What kind of doctor should I be?

 

Becoming a doctor is an admirable decision. It’s a rewarding career - but one that comes with great responsibility and lots of important decisions. But one of the biggest determinations to make before starting a career is deciding, "" A lot of factors should go into that decision. Below are five aspects to consider as you contemplate which specialty to enter and make your career.   Your personal preferences and clinical interests More than anyone else, you know what most interests you and why. Think about your encounters with health care throughout your life. Maybe you, a friend o....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Drew Terry Drew Terry
 

5 rural and urban practice myths to consider

 

When determining where to live and practice, consider these five pros and cons, myths, and exaggerations of practices in a rural vs. urban setting. . Yes, people in rural communities are friendly. Sometimes you may even have unsolicited friendliness. I can tell you first-hand that the bonds and relationships you make while living in a rural community are worth the few times you must stop when you are not in the mood to have a conversation. Advice for the rural physician: Have some boundaries. If there is only one grocery store near you, and you go with your family or you run in to get somethin....

 

Read PracticeLink articles from Michele Gutermuth. Michele Gutermuth
 

4 relocation questions to answer before you accept the offer

 

As you consider where you’d like to practice, there may be multiple reasons for you and your family to move based on the program or opportunity you desire. The prospect of relocation will most likely occur at least once in your career, so you want to plan ahead and consider various aspects of the decision. Before you accept a new position, ask yourself these relocation questions:   Are we willing to relocate? Whether you want to move - and if it makes sense for your family - is the first question you’ll need to ask yourself or discuss with your family. A move impacts not o....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Megan Trippi Megan Trippi
 

5 signs it’s time for a new job

 

Physicians work hard - sometimes too hard. While certain stressors come with the role, others are avoidable in the right setting, alongside the right team. If you’re unhappy with your job, you may be asking yourself whether it’s time for a much-needed break, or a new opportunity altogether. So, how can you make the distinction? Here are a few signs you might be ready to look elsewhere for employment: You don’t feel connected to coworkers Community and culture are important, and feeling like you’re part of a lively, cohesive team can be the difference between workdays ....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

6 “musts” for your letter of interest

 

A letter of interest, sometimes called a letter of intent, is a job-search tool designed to do exactly what it seems: inform others of your interest. As a job seeker, it’s a good idea to know how to write a letter of interest to put yourself on the radar of prospective employers and identify yourself as an eager candidate. Here are six best practices to make yours compelling to recruiters and worth holding onto for future consideration. Be professional, but personable As you draft your letter of interest, pay attention to length and tone. Your letter should be brief and come across as p....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

Requesting your salary

 

You finished your residency or fellowship, and you’re going through the final stages of the recruitment process for your first job after training - then comes the money discussion. This can be intimidating if you aren’t prepared. It’s important to remember the person with whom you are speaking - and negotiating - has done this many times before, so equip yourself with the knowledge and understanding of what you want and what you deserve before you approach the subject with these tips: Do your research In order to know how much money you should request or receive, make y....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Megan Trippi Megan Trippi
 

Medicare Advantage plan pros and cons

 

Medicare Advantage plans continue to be a topic of discussion, as this is a popular private insurance alternative to traditional Medicare. There are pros and cons to you as a physician and to your patients when choosing to participate in these plans. Most plans have long-term savings and flexibility, and some think they offer better care, but plans can come with additional costs, offer fewer choices when it comes to providers, and have some other challenges. Some plans offer hospitalization, hospice care, doctor’s visits, drug coverage, preventative care, dental, vision, and hearing cove....

 

Read PracticeLink articles from Michele Gutermuth. Michele Gutermuth
 

What to expect with relocation assistance

 

You’ve found the opportunity you’ve been looking for and you’re ready to make the move. Now what? Many organizations offer some type of moving assistance, though it can vary based on the situation. Here are some ways you might expect to receive support as you relocate and transition into your new community: Guidance with licensing and credentialing If your new position requires a move across state lines, it’s likely your organization will provide information about that state’s licensing and credentialing requirements. Your license and credentials will need to be ....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

Where to live and practice?

 

Where to practice? This is often one of the most challenging decisions every physician and advanced practice provider must make at some point in their career. Whether you’re on the hunt for your first opportunity after training or looking to make a change, there are many details to consider. Rest assured, you’re not alone if you have concerns about making the right decision on where to advance your career. When determining if the options you’re exploring will be a good fit, try asking yourself these questions to simplify the decision-making process. Where do you feel most ful....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

Understanding competition in your specialty

 

When looking for a job, it’s good to know what the market looks like in your specialty. Each quarter, PracticeLink pulls the most challenging specialties to recruit, and the specialties with the highest demand. The larger the "jobs per candidate," the lower the competition for those opportunities. The Most Challenging to Recruit Specialties are those with the highest demand-to-supply ratio in the PracticeLink system. The Most-In-Demand Specialties represent those that have the most jobs overall posted on PracticeLink – specialties for which the demand for physicians is hi....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Megan Trippi Megan Trippi
 

Writing a compelling CV

 

Many job seekers know ’CV’ is short for ’curriculum vitae’, but did you know the Latin phrase translates in English to "the course of life"? It makes sense considering your CV’s goal is to highlight the course of your professional, educational and extracurricular experiences to help you take the next step in your career. It’s essential for your CV to be complete, well-organized and compelling to employers in order to help you land the job you want. So, here are some tips to get yours moving in the right direction: CV or resume? Before sitting down to craft y....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

8 ways to create a positive digital footprint

 

I am on social media for professional purposes. While on Twitter, I often cringe when I see what is posted by medical students, residents and fellows. The cringeworthy posts sometimes start like this: “Wow, instead of giving me free items for battling the pandemic while in residency, I’d rather earn more money,” or, “Do you think I am really going to treat you like everyone else when you’re yelling at me?” This reminds me of the many times I have had to make a phone call to some millennial and Generation Z acquaintances and advise them to unlike a post or de....

 

Read PracticeLink articles from Michele Gutermuth. Michele Gutermuth
 

Creative ideas for celebrating Match Day 2021 in a virtual world

 

Match Day and graduation embody the culmination of four years of medical school. The former provides insight into the institutions where individuals will complete their residency training. The latter earns medical students the title of doctor. Both exist as significant rites of passage for soon-to-be physicians. Like most milestone achievements during the pandemic, adjustments were necessary to accommodate social distancing and the virtual world. Indeed, Match Day 2020 (March 20, 2020) was one of the first critical events disrupted in Graduate Medical Education (GME). Medical schools were forc....

 

Read PracticeLink articles from the CEO of Thalamus Jason Reminick
 

4 factors to consider before your next medical mission

 

There are many reasons physicians choose to take on service activities in addition to their time spent practicing. Some do so for the experience, to add variation to their schedules, to step outside of their comfort zone or just for the sake of making a difference. Taking on extra projects, aiding communities in need and pursuing medical missions can be extremely rewarding but - whatever your motivation - you will want to consider these aspects before making a commitment:   Your bandwidth One of the most important - and first - things to consider before jumping into another oppor....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

7 ways COVID-19 has improved the physician job search

 

There have been a lot of posts about how COVID-19 has forever changed the way physicians are recruited. I would agree with most of these articles, but here are some things you can do to make these changes better.   To make sure you have face-to-face interaction, try to go to as many functions as the current situation allows. Whenever things do get better, and they will, don’t forget to do this. Make a goal and place it in your calendar. Show up to a breakfast grab and go. Come to a lunch and learn. Volunteer on an advisory committee if you are asked. All these things will help you g....

 

Read PracticeLink articles from Michele Gutermuth. Michele Gutermuth
 

Understanding salary vs. total compensation

 

You’re looking for jobs, interviewing and starting to receive offers, but how do you know which provides the best value for you? To understand your offer, it’s important to know all the aspects of the contract, especially how it will impact your earning potential. Compensation is a large factor when accepting an offer, especially if it’s your first position. Overall compensation can vary based on salary, shares, productivity bonuses, RVUs (relative value units used in reimbursement formulas for physician services), benefits and expenses. Your salary is the base level of pay y....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Megan Trippi Megan Trippi
 

How a hobby helps with wellness

 

Before you became a physician - and as a physician - you’re a person with many interests, goals and ideas. It would be narrow-minded to think every health care worker’s sole passion is practicing medicine. While that may be a large one, it’s likely you have other dreams you’ve thought about pursuing. The good news is that it’s not just possible, but ideal, for your personal and professional life to engage with hobbies or interests that aren’t exclusive to your time spent practicing. Nurturing these types of hobbies offer some distance from work life and ....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

Healthy habits make healthy providers

 

Did you ever think your patients could benefit from you following the same advice you offer them? Exercise and a healthy diet are only the tip of the wellness iceberg but, as a physician or advanced practice provider, you know these small decisions add up to a big difference. When you reflect on your own habits, ask yourself if you’re taking proper steps to be your best self - both physically and mentally. Here are some reminders of how your diet and physical activity can directly impact your performance as a health care professional: Increased energy and alertness As you make rounds, ....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

5 aspects to consider when you have multiple offers

 

When a bride picks out her wedding dress, she stops shopping, and so should you once you find the ideal practice opportunity! Here are five factors to help you identify the right choice when considering multiple offers: Did you make a verbal or written commitment? Once you have made a final decision on a job opportunity, stop answering calls from recruiters and stop going on job board websites. Do not tempt yourself. This will only make you doubt your decision, which was a great decision at one point, and it will possibly put you in a place where you will burn a bridge that can last a lifetim....

 

Read PracticeLink articles from Michele Gutermuth. Michele Gutermuth
 

Top three benefits to getting away

 

Being a physician is stressful; being a physician in 2020 and 2021 during a global pandemic added new meaning to that stress.  You’ve had to adapt to unprecedented demands, and in many cases change how you provide patient care. If you can, take advantage of time away from work to reset and - after this past year - you may need it more than ever. There are many benefits to taking a vacation or getting away from the demands of work, and below are three that should have you planning your next trip and unplugging soon. Increased happiness The Institute for Applied Positive Research ....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Megan Trippi Megan Trippi
 

Choosing the best practice fit for you

 

As you advance through residency or fellowship, a few questions may come to mind. "What will my future job look like?" "Will there be opportunities for experience and growth?" "Where do I want to live and practice?" "Will I like my job?" If trends hold, the chances are you’ll like a lot of the answers to those questions. According to an American Medical Association survey, nine in 10 physicians are satisfied with their career choice despite challenges common to each career stage. As you ponder and plan your future career, be sure to also ask yourself: "What’s my best practice fit?"....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Drew Terry Drew Terry
 

Finding a sense of passion in your practice

 

When the daily grind starts to feel more like going through the motions, it can be difficult to feel passionate about the work we’re doing - and passion is key in your profession as a physician. It keeps you sharp, engaged, enthusiastic and empathetic as you practice. But constantly making rounds, seeing patients and filling out charts can become monotonous without hitting the refresh button. If predictable patterns and routines are starting to steal your spark, check out these ideas to re-center, get out of the day-to-day rut and renew the passion in your practice. Offer mentorship I....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

5 questions to ask during a career fair

 

You’re beginning your job search - or maybe you just want to see what is available - so you start looking at job boards, reaching out to recruiters and possibly attending career fairs. There are many ways to get a feel for the health care job market, but live and virtual career fairs put you in front of hiring organizations and give you a chance to meet with and speak to multiple recruiters in only a few hours. They can almost be treated as mini interviews, which means you want to be prepared and have questions ready so you know which organization might be the best fit for you. Here ....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Megan Trippi Megan Trippi
 

Physicians’ New Year’s resolutions after a year of COVID

 

2020 will be a year remembered for widespread disruption because of COVID-19. Some were fortunate enough that the interruption only meant working from home and canceling plans. For others, it was losing a job, facing serious illness or losing a loved one. As we head into 2021, the longstanding tradition of New Year’s resolutions offers an opportunity to reflect on the past year and determine what we’d like to improve in the coming year. According to a CIT Bank survey conducted by The Harris Poll, 43 percent of Americans intend to make New Year’s resolutions heading into 2021,....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Drew Terry Drew Terry
 

Telehealth's role in health care

 

Telehealth has been around for years, but it became more common during the COVID-19 pandemic. Telehealth or telemedicine’s growth increased because of a desperate need to reduce in-person visits at the beginning of the pandemic and was boosted by the U.S. government’s rare move to loosen some Medicare policy and payment restrictions. Because Medicare has lowered its requirements, insurance companies have been slowly following suit. For instance, there was the Medicare Expansion program, which allowed telehealth visits to be considered the same as in-person visits and physicians to ....

 

Read PracticeLink articles from Michele Gutermuth. Michele Gutermuth
 

A new approach to goal setting

 

Without a plan, a goal is just a wish. It takes deliberate steps to map out the best approach to achieving any worthwhile objective. As you’re thinking about what you want to achieve in the next year, five years or even five days, these steps can help give life to your goals and make them more manageable - and hopefully, more reachable.  What do you want to achieve? Just as important as keeping goals is deciding which are worth setting in the first place. Is it landing a job with your first choice? Securing an interview? Finding a mentor? Finishing training? Or even advancing to a....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

Avoiding burnout during a pandemic

 

Nearly every industry faces burnout in its employees. It could be said medical professionals face a larger amount of burnout, especially during the holiday season when many others get to unwind and be with family. Add a global pandemic, the stress of caring for COVID-19 patients and the risk of exposure to the virus, and burnout is almost inevitable. Even if you aren’t working in a COVID facility, talking to patients about the pandemic, making sure your patients are avoiding exposure and taking all the proper precautions yourself can begin to take its toll. Burnout is extremely common an....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Megan Trippi Megan Trippi
 

Know the job search steps and timeline

 

A lot of time, energy and effort - not to mention money - go into studying and training to become a physician or advanced practice provider. With so much focus on earning the degree and completing residency or fellowship, it’s easy to forget finding the right practice may take a little time and energy, too. A job search doesn’t have to be stressful. By following these 10 steps and sticking to a timeline, you become better prepared - and more confident - in searching for and securing your first or next practice.   Start exploring your options Start - 24 months before ....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Drew Terry Drew Terry
 

Think location when evaluating where to practice

 

Price is a major factor when purchasing a new car, but it’s not the only detail to consider. That decision is based on much more than a dollar figure. What’s the vehicle make, model and year? Is it the right performance trim? Does it have the heated seats, moonroof and other extras you enjoy? Those additional details factor heavily into determining whether the asking price is worth signing the paperwork. Salary plays a similar role when reviewing contract offers. While base pay and incentives are important, things like the practice location can influence their true value. Consider ....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Drew Terry Drew Terry
 

Minimizing stress around time off

 

There’s a lot about being a physician that can be stress-inducing. From long hours to physically, mentally and emotionally demanding tasks, there’s not much about your job that’s simple. It can be especially difficult to get out from underneath stress when on the clock, and even once you step away. Finding balance between work and personal time as a health care worker is more critical than ever right now - but just as important is how you manage and minimize work stress when you’re not practicing. As you take time off to rest and recharge, here are some ways you can k....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Alexandra Cappetta Alexandra Cappetta
 

Expanding telehealth to help providers

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected many industries and has had an especially large impact on health care. Because of this, Congress and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services passed the use of certain programs to support providers as they continue to care for patients. One way to help was expanding telehealth to give providers an additional way to see patients. Telehealth allows patients and their families to stay in the comfort and safety of their own home and not travel to a facility. This accessibility means patients save time driving and waiting in the office, and don’t nee....

 

Read PracticeLink articles by Megan Trippi Megan Trippi
 

What physicians should know about the Conrad 30 Program

 

If you’re a physician who has a J-1 visa and you are seeking a waiver in place of the two-year home residency requirement, you may be aware of the Conrad 30 program and its benefits. Conrad 30 allows each state to select 30 physicians to submit to the U.S. Department of State to be chosen for a J-1 visa waiver. Although a great resource, it helps to know the program’s limitations. One of them is the timing each state has to accept these applications. The federal government’s fiscal year is from Oct. 1 through Sept. 30. Each Conrad 30 J-1 visa waiver program follows a similar ....

 

Read PracticeLink articles from Michele Gutermuth. Michele Gutermuth
 

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