PracticeLink Magazine

Winter 2019

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

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36 W INTER 2019 PracticeLink.com ▼ T HE Qu AL I T y O f L I f E ISS u E D E P A R T M E N T S Tech Notes iltifat H u S ai N, M.D. CDC releases two new apps These free apps are instrumental to physicians. i N t H i S e D itio N of te CH N ote S, i W ill C o V e R t HR ee R e C e N tly R elea S e D M e D i C al a PPS. They're all from venerable institutions, and they're all free to download. CDC Anticoagulation Manager I've always been a fan of apps produced by the CDC. Even though I know they produce quality apps, I was pleasantly surprised when they recently released the Anticoagulation Manager. There are already several other anticoagulation management medical apps available. However, the CDC's app surpasses both. One of my favorite parts of the app is that, instead of just presenting the data, it gives you three of the most often-encountered clinical scenarios: Do you want to start a patient on anticoagulation; switch the patient's current regime; or reverse a patient's anticoagulation. Over the past few years, the usage of N o ACs has increased tremendously for common conditions such as a-fib, and the app takes this into account. Where the CDC's app really shines, though, is in its ability to help through various "tricky" clinical scenarios, such as what to do for patients who are pregnant or have chronic kidney disease. The app doesn't go into granular details, but rather mentions key papers that explain the reasoning in more detail. It would have been helpful for the development team to include hyperlinks to PubMed instead of having to do manual searches of the papers listed. The CDC specified that this app was developed through a collaborative effort with the Georgia Institute of Technology. This is notable, as most of the CDC's other apps don't announce a collaboration. (That also might explain why the user interface is my favorite out of all the CDC's apps.) My only frustration is that it isn't available on Android yet. p Price: Free. Apple: apple.co/2NqlRBE

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