PracticeLink Magazine

Spring 2019

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

Issue link: https://magazine.practicelink.com/i/1087205

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 44 of 91

PracticeLink.com S PRIN g 2019 45 T E C H N O T E S of the A merican College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (AC og ) District II. SMI started in 2013 and works with over 10,000 health care providers and 118 birthing facilities to help develop a standard approach to handling obstetric emergencies associated with maternal mortality and morbidity. The application itself contains position statements, guidelines, checklists, algorithms and teaching slides. You are able to highlight and bookmark key bundles and checklists. An interesting feature of the app is the ability to leave feedback. If you click the star icon within a document, you are able to give ratings on the actual content. There is an additional section for leaving detailed text feedback. My only criticism of the app is in the lack of conversion of the PDF files. The actual content is presented in PDF forms. While the PDFs themselves are relatively easy to read on a mobile device, it would have been much better to convert the PDFs into a native i o S or Android format for reading. Overall, it's great to see AC og 's District II take on such an important task and help standardize management of the main causes of maternal mortality. Pedi Crisis 2.0 The Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) created Pedi Crisis 2.0, a medical app that has peer-reviewed algorithms for treating 26 pediatric crisis situations. Not only is there specific treatment advice, but the application also contains checklists and differentials. Pedi Crisis allows you to enter the weight of the pediatric patient you're taking care of, then gives you specific dosing advice throughout the app. The application has a really interesting user interface, with a host of hyperlinks throughout that allow you to jump around the pediatric crisis situations. A lot of thought went into the user interface, shown in the "phone numbers" section. Instead of just having a blank screen for providers to input key numbers, the application gives you specific sections and categories for the phone numbers, such as "code team," "blood bank," " e CM o " and more. Almost all medical societies have algorithms and treatment plans they give guidance on, and it would be great to see more of them getting into the mobile space by providing value add mobile apps such as Pedi Crisis. Natural Cycles Natural Cycles is the first FDA-cleared mobile medical application that can be used as a method of contraception to prevent pregnancy. It's important to note the mobile application isn't "approved," but "cleared." This means the FDA is allowing the application to market this specific medical use. Why does the FDA stamp matter here? The story is actually pretty interesting. The FDA reviewed the Natural Cycles app through the new de novo premarket review pathway. This is a regulatory pathway for novel, low-to-moderate risk devices of a new type. This now allows mobile medical apps to go through the FDA's 510(k) process, allowing them to obtain marketing authorization for their claims. Natural Cycles contains an algorithm that calculates the days of the month a woman is likely to be fertile based on daily body temperature readings and menstrual cycle information. This is a type of contraception referred to as fertility awareness. The daily body temperature reading is based on a basal body temperature, which is the lowest body temperature attained during rest (immediately after awakening). The Natural Cycles app algorithm was originally created by nuclear physicist Elina Berglund Scherwitzl, a Nobel Prize winner. The app launched in 2014, and Price: Free. iPhone, iPad: apple.co/2A3YOEx. Android: bit.ly/2BBbHWX.

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of PracticeLink Magazine - Spring 2019