PracticeLink Magazine

Spring 2019

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

Issue link: https://magazine.practicelink.com/i/1087205

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60 S PRIN g 2019 PracticeLink.com features lengthy recruitment process (with the exception of a highly skilled or specialized field), negative comments about past employees, recent changes in management or corporate shuffling. Trust your instincts if something seems questionable. You should also do your own research to learn why a company is hiring. See if anyone in your network has connections with this company — and what people are saying about it online. "Google the practice and see how social media likes them," suggests Janet Gersten, M.D., an o B- g YN with TopLine MD Health Alliance in Miami. "Nurses at the local hospitals will generally give you the established opinion." What kind of malpractice coverage is offered? As a doctor, malpractice insurance is an obvious necessity. Without adequate coverage, a claim of negligence or wrongful treatment could have devastating effects on your finances and your future. But it's not enough to make sure your employer offers it and check that question off the list. Dig deeper to find out everything you need to know. "Many new doctors will hear that the job offers malpractice coverage, and that's it. But ask for details: What type is it, and who is paying?" urges Adeeti Gupta, M.D., an o B- g YN and founder of Walk IN g YN Care in New York City. There are two common types of policies: claims-made and occurrence-based. With a claims-made policy, your coverage only lasts as long as you remain with your employer. Occurrence-based policies offer coverage for any claims made against you during the covered timeframe — even after you leave the company. "If it is just claims-made, when you leave, you have to buy tail coverage," Gupta says. "It is costly. Some doctors get stuck with a job because they can't afford the tail coverage, especially in o B- g YN." Formally called an extended reporting endorsement ( e R e ), tail insurance is an add-on provision that extends coverage to any claims raised after you've left the employer. Don't be afraid to negotiate with your prospective employer regarding tail coverage, Gupta adds. Some employers will split the cost or pay a percentage. If so, inquire carefully about the terms. Some arrangements may involve withholding your portion of payment from your final paychecks. Malpractice insurance policies and regulations vary by state and by carrier, so do your research. Talk to seasoned colleagues before you interview to learn key factors to consider in the area. What is required in terms of call hours? Some type of call responsibility is part of the workload for most physician positions. But what this means varies greatly based on many factors: the type and size of practice, physician seniority, holiday schedules and more. Understanding these factors will help ensure this job fits your vision of work/life balance. For example, if you have young children at home and live far from family, extensive call responsibilities can become a strain. "A sk questions," recom mends Da r r ia Long Gillespie, M.D., MBA. "How often do you have to cover, including holidays? How many different locations do you have to cover? That's particularly crucial if you may have to drive between them." Also ask about the logistics: Will you be required to remain on site while you're on call or within a certain geographic radius? What is your expected response time? Are there any transportation requirements you must adhere to, particularly if you live in a big city? How will you establish a panel? As a new face in the crowd, it can take a little time to build up your patient base. Find out how patients are distributed. Does the organization have policies to ensure even distribution? Are you expected to attract your own patients? Are you encouraged to market your services — or prohibited from doing so? This can also be a good question to raise with potential colleagues. Ask them how quickly their patient populations grew and whether they faced any challenges when it came to building a patient base. How does the organization support personal growth? Your immediate focus may be landing a job, but don't lose sight of your future aspirations. An interview is a good opportunity to determine if the company aligns with your long-term goals.

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