PracticeLink Magazine

Spring 2019

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

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74 S PRIN g 2019 PracticeLink.com features Our Mission: We, Trinity Health, serve together in the spirit of the Gospel as a compassionate and transforming healing presence within our communities. trinity-health.org/physician-postings PARTNER WITH TRINITY HEALTH Explore the Possibilities Trinity Health is one of the largest multi-institutional Catholic health care delivery systems in the nation. Serving people and communities in 22 states from coast to coast with 92 hospitals, and 120 continuing care locations — including home care, hospice, PACE and senior living facilities - that provide nearly 2.5 million visits annually. If you would like to be part of the Trinity Health system, we encourage you to explore the possibilities. Visit our website www.trinity-health.org/ physician-postings for employed physician or independent practice opportunities affiliated with Trinity Health, or contact our Physician Recruitment Department at 734-343-2300 or email docopps@trinity-health.org . Conducting interviews and site visits (residency, autumn of year 3) P h YSI c I a N At this point, you should have your interviews and site visits arranged. Before any interview, Gleason says it's a good idea for physicians to research potential employers. "It can be a way to show they're serious about the position and the community as well as enhance the research they started at the time they launched their job search," she explains. When it comes to the interview itsel f, Her tz says sma l l stu ff matters. "Be professional, dress appropriately, remember basic social skills," he recommends. And Rodriguez says it's worthwhile to imagine yourself on the other side of the table. "I changed how I thought about the job search," he says. "I try to see it from the other side, to think about the employer's needs. Would I be a good hire for them? I want to make sure I'm what they're looking for." Thomas says he goes into every interview with a list of questions. "The employer's responses will help you make a better decision about the position because you've raised points that are important to you," he explains. And while you're thinking about what's important to you, Barr says to remember that employers are not allowed to bring up your family unless you do. Depending on your situation, you may choose not to. "There can be discrimination with regard to physicians and families," she says. That's true whether the applicant is male or female, so if this is something that concerns you, keep your family out of the interview. Once you've finished the interview, your contact at the employer will likely give you a timeline for the decision. Follow-up emails and calls are appropriate. "The timing can vary, but I would say an email every week or two is likely appropriate," Gleason says.

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