PracticeLink Magazine

SUMMER 2014

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

Issue link: https://magazine.practicelink.com/i/332444

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Take it from me... About to head out on some interviews? First spend some time with these physicians as they share their own job-search lessons. Job search: Don't miss the basics Conducting a thorough job search is critical in re- alizing your professional dreams. You want to have enough opportunities to weigh your options and enough information to get an accurate picture of each one. But what did physicians who have already transitioned from training to full-f edged practice fail to do or notice in pursuing their own positions? One piece of advice echoed by many is to pay closer attention to the tactics necessary to structure a productive pursuit: Begin early to target the best options, conduct due diligence and negotiate a good deal. Additionally, don't be afraid to widen your search to options normally below your radar. Even though your dream practice is on one coast or the other, it may be worth your while to listen when a hiring team from an institution elsewhere in the country calls. By recalculating your GPS, you might uncover a very satisfying career in a place you never anticipated. As one physician noted: "The landscape of your work and home life becomes dramatically different as you f nish training and jump into your f rst job. So it's worthwhile to be open-minded…to explore situations that may have seemed unorthodox in the past." Related: Site visit savvy ow.ly/wTg5P Christian Millett, M.D., knew he was a city person BY CHRIS HINZ Continued SUMMER 2014 PracticeLink.com | 55 2014 Annual Interview ISSUE W HEN BROOKE BUCKLEY, M.D., was search- ing for her f rst position as a general surgeon in 2007, she didn't appreciate how impor- tant it was to make the organization's future plans a focus of the interview. It didn't cross her mind to ask about the direction of the organization, much less how her surgical role might be modif ed in the future. Turns out that one system's plan for regionaliza- tion—funneling patients from small outpost hos- pitals into big medical centers where services and doctors are consolidated—would signif cantly inf u- ence the types of cases she would be treating in the future. And that wasn't the direction she wanted her career to take. You're looking for a job that utilizes your skills, fulf lls your drive and lets you grow as a physician. What could go wrong? Plenty, if you're not on the top of the job-search game. Admittedly, you can't unearth every nuance about a place until you're actually part of it. But you can learn a bevy of lessons from others who enjoy the benef ts of retrospect. What should they have asked or done that they didn't ask or do to get the most from their interviews and site visits? Their hind- sight could prove great foresight for you! 2 4 3 - S u m 1 4 . i n d d 5 5 243-Sum14.indd 55 6 / 1 2 / 1 4 5 : 5 7 P M 6/12/14 5:57 PM

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