PracticeLink Magazine

FALL 2014

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

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46 | PracticeLink.com FALL 2014 attorney on your best next steps. 9. K now if and when to hire an attorney. When it comes to academic medicine, you can forget hiring an attorney to negotiate for you, says Saint. "If we see an attorney come in to negotiate for you, we wonder what kind of employee you're going to be," he says. Whipple also eschews attorneys during the negotiating process. "I don't think anyone is going to fght harder for you than you," she says. She does, however, hire an attor- ney to review the contract she's negotiated. And that's the best procedure to follow, says Kratz. "The attorney should take on an advisory role," she says. They should review the contract, but not step into the nego- tiating process unless they're really needed. "You are the best negotiator for you," she says. Still, "Some clients want the attorney to be the bad guy," says Laurence. "They want us to do the negotiating." Overall, though, lawyers are best left out of the nego- tiating process, she says. But do bring them in for the fnal review before you sign, says Kinley. "You'll want an attorney just to understand what you're signing." Adds Kratz: "You also want to ensure that the contract you've negotiated refects your expectations." If you do decide to hire an attor- ney, your best bet is to ask colleagues for referrals. Another option, says Kratz, is to contact your state bar association and ask to be referred to a health law attorney in your area. "It's important to look for someone in health law, because they'll know the terminology involved, they'll know what the health care laws are in that state, and what the contracts there look like," says Manko. Yes, it may take an attorney as long as a week to review the contract, but it shouldn't hold up the process unless there are a number of items that need to be negotiated. Gener- ally, however, the entire process from the point an employer offers a contract (usually a week after making the offer) to your negotiations, and an attorney review will typically take about two weeks overall. Whipple says that it's time well spent. Employment & Private Practice Models • Tailored Compensation Packages Student Loan Repayment • Residency Stipends • Immigration Assistance LifePoint Hospitals is a leading hospital company dedicated to providing quality healthcare in over 60 communities across the nation. LifePoint is a place where physicians want to practice and where our partnerships with excellent practice groups and reputable academic organizations makes us a top choice. We have over 200 opportunities nationwide covering all specialties so please email or call us for details. 866-864-2680 · www.LifepointGoodLife.com OPPORTUNITIES: Family Medicine Neurology Pediatrics Gastroenterology OB/Gyn Ophthalmology Pulmonology Psychiatry Contact: Kim.Davis@LPNT.net Internal Medicine General Surgery Orthopedic Surgery ENT Endocrinology Cardiology Rheumatology Urology Contact: Dwinna.Mullins@LPNT.net Before you sign... Continued from page 45

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