PracticeLink Magazine

Summer 2017

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

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Lead a team that surrounds patients with care. At UnityPoint Clinic, we're recruiting doctors who believe there's strength in unity. Who believe in teamwork and collaboration. And bring out the best in those around them. Doctors whose opinions are sought and are valued. Whose ideas matter. Doctors who want to grow their careers in one of the top 100 places to work in health care*. If that's a career path you're interested in taking, visit practicewithunitypoint.org to find career opportunities in our clinics throughout Iowa, Illinois and Wisconsin. The point of unity is you. ® * According to Becker's Hospital Review For more information: R achel Gusta fson R achel.Gusta fson@un it y point .org (515) 47 1-9770 Visit practicewithunitypoint.org to find career opportunities. 28  S u MM e R 2017 PracticeLink.com too. One night, 40 people were killed and the bodies were lined up … a lot of horrific scenes. I went online that night to different news outlets, and there was no mention of the incident. That's why the people feel that the world has turned their backs on them. Medical missions expose its participants to uncomfortable truths of grave injustices. What surprised you most? The limitation of resources. The destruction is beyond anything that Hollywood could produce — the oldest civilized city in the world with a population of 3 million, reduced to rubble. It's an unbelievable level of deprivation. It surprised me that the surgical room had a bug zapper in it, particularly in a country that had an excellent health care system 10 years ago. What appeared to be a soda machine was actually a blood bank. There are shortages of all medicines. Bringing narcotics across the border is not possible. I had to put a chest tube in a man with no analgesics at all. He begged me to let him die. Pain medication has to be rationed. This should never have to happen. Do you have any advice for physicians considering medical missions? The first thing to do is to find something you feel passionate about. Look for a credible and trustworthy organization to work with. Preferably, find something you can benefit from in whatever field you are in. Working as an emergency physician meant working in Aleppo made more sense than on the periphery where people by definition are stable. Talk to other physicians and learn from their experiences. Insight into which medical missions are good is generally [gathered] through word of mouth. If you decide to go somewhere where you could be in danger, you really need to give it a lot of thought. Pray and make sure you are 100 percent mentally and psychologically onboard. Is there anything else you'd like to add? As I just mentioned, pray about it. Make sure it's what you want to do, particularly if it's a dangerous venue. Once you are there, fear should not drive or dictate anything you do. Take a lot of stuffed animals as kids really love that. A lot of times, it's not the medical work that we do; it's your actions and genuine caring that people notice. It's very meaningful and uplifting that somebody came thousands of miles across the ocean to care for them. That will do more good a lot of times than any application of medical knowledge will. Do your homework. Learn about the culture of those you will be serving as provision — culturally sensitive care maximizes your effectiveness as a physician. ●

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