PracticeLink Magazine

Summer 2017

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

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features 56  S u MM e R 2017 PracticeLink.com consulting firm Premier Physician Agency, believes this trend may be because, "early in their careers, most young physicians do not know how to fully evaluate their job options, nor at that point, even know which practice settings or locations are most conducive to meeting their professional and personal goals." But relocating closer to family, or even moving for more opportunity, like Young, can also explain the frequent exoduses. As anyone who has ever moved can tell you, however, relocating is not easy. That's why it deserves careful consideration. Your experience, of course, will be unique, but their suggestions may provide you with a road map to make your relocation a bit easier. 1  KNOW YOUR CONTRACT First, understand the consequences of leav i ng you r c u r rent job. "Physicians need an adequate exit strategy before making the decision to relocate," says Hinds. "They need to review their contracts to fully understand the termination process and potential risks." It's possible you'll have to return at least a portion (if not all) of any signing bonus if you leave before your contract term is up. "Responsibility for pu rchasing malpractice tail coverage could also be tied to completion of the full contract term," Hinds adds. Any of these factors may play a part in your decision to leave — or at least in your timeline to relocate. "Seek i ng lega l adv ice to help determine your ideal exit strategy is very important," says Hinds. 2  VISIT BEFORE YOU DECIDE In other words, "Don't Skype the interview," says Edie Webber, ow ner of Pinnacle Relocation Services. "You really have to go and visit in person." That's the only way you will pick up on what Webber calls intangibles — the feel and culture of a place and the people who live and work there. "A place should make

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