PracticeLink Magazine

FALL 2017

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

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the CONTRACTS & COMPENSATION issue PracticeLink.com   FALL 2017 51 professor's contract term. You may also be able to ask for more "protected time," or the time set aside for research. For example, 10 or 20 percent of your workweek may be designated for research work. That's the protected time. Early in your career, it may be more difficult to be granted more protected time, however, and typically you want to be operating and applying your skills at this stage. You could also ask for a research coordinator, depending on your research interests. Even if you share the coordinator with others, the role is integral to completing most clinical research for consenting, m a i nt a i n i n g d a t a b a s e s a n d processing institutional review board paperwork. If you're applying for something other than your first job, you will want to take a step up, which may include seeking a promotion or a program director position. In evaluating your request for a higher salary, more research funding and perhaps more lab space, the university will likely look at your skills and reputation, your research track record, and the number of publications you've contributed to, says Litle. "The higher you rise, the more negotiating you can do," she says. In academics, some physicians stay at the associate professor level for the remainder of their careers, though 8 to 10 years is more typical, she explains. The speed with which doctors are promoted typically reflects their publication and funding record. Sometimes to get what you need, you have to make motions to leave. As with any job, you don't want to do this unless you actually have an offer from another institution that meets all your needs. But having an offer in hand from another university can make you that much more desirable to your current employer and allows for negotiations with both parties, explains Litle. Jumping from one university to another is not considered a negative. According to Litle, "People move around a lot in academics." p Jeffrey Vogel, M.D., M.P. h ., suggests researching the industry standards for your specialty's compensation. Identify the salaries in the 25th, 50th and 75th percentiles to get a realistic framework for what you might expect to be paid. · Photo by Kevin Day See this issue's physicians in exclusive video interviews at Facebook.com/PracticeLink

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