PracticeLink Magazine

FALL 2017

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

Issue link: https://magazine.practicelink.com/i/866760

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 51 of 95

features 52 FALL 2017   PracticeLink.com A WellSpan Physician Career: What's your goal? Join WellSpan Medical Group, a physician-led organizaƟon providing innovaƟve care throughout southcentral Pennsylvania. We are part of WellSpan Health, one of the region's largest integrated health systems, with more than 1,200 providers, a network of six community and teaching hospitals, and comprehensive specialty care services. We're transforming the paƟent experience through health IT and care coordinaƟon across providers, care environments and life stages. At WellSpan, your goals are our goals. To learn more about physician and other provider opportuniƟes, or to apply, visit WellSpan.org/Careers or send your CV to: Josh Irwin, MBA Director, Physician RecruiƟng jirwin2@wellspan.org Intellectual property rights A not he r d i f fe re nce b e t we e n academic and hospital or private practice jobs is the rise of contracts demanding rights to supplemental income earned by physicians. It has long been customary in academic settings to include a provision in the contract that stipulates that any supplemental revenue the physician makes while an employee is the property of their employer, says Mason. "However, we're seeing more private practices, not just universities, writing into contracts that any supplemental revenue that the physician generates — f r o m s p e a k i n g , i nt e l l e c t u a l property or stock dividends, for example — belongs to the employer." Mason says that [for] "employers [to] collect revenue from work done relevant to clinical responsibilities and patient care is reasonable." After all, you are their employee, she points out, and most employment contracts lay claim to new ideas developed during the workday. In the case of an independent idea, however, you may want to claim ownership. In general, you "want to retain the right to create, innovate and problem-solve" for your own benefit, she says. "Practices are often willing to negotiate this point," she says, but you need to be aware of it and how best to modify it to meet your personal goals and objectives. Terms to understand Beyond the compensation package, there are other elements of your employment agreement that you'll want to hone in on, says Mason. The big three include duties and responsibilities, noncompete clauses and termination clauses. These are sections that you will be unable to remove completely, but you may have room to ask for minor changes. Duties and responsibilities. In this section you'll find information on the amount of time you'll spend working each week, the frequency of call you'll be required to take, whether you will have time for research and other specifics about your job responsibilities. Though you can't negotiate basic responsibilities, such as seeing patients or teaching hours, you may be able to ask for less call — or more call in exchange for more admin support. Noncompete. Most practices won't negotiate this clause out completely. However, you can ask for the terms to be reasonable in scope and duration. For example, not being permitted to practice within a 10- to 25-mile radius rather than 25 to 50 miles, or having the noncompete in place for one year rather than five. In many cases, the willingness of a practice to negotiate may hinge on the population density of the area. In larger cities, the scope of the non- compete can be smaller, due to the larger number of patients in a small geographic area, whereas in more rural practices, the non-compete radius may be larger because there are fewer doctors in general and your moving practices could cause

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of PracticeLink Magazine - FALL 2017