PracticeLink Magazine

FALL 2017

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

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features 72 FALL 2017   PracticeLink.com For more information, contact Mike Doyle, Director of Business Development (508) 973-2760 providerrecruitment@southcoast.org More than medicine. Southcoast Health is one of the largest and fastest growing health systems in New England. Since its inception in 1996, Southcoast has become a sought-after destination for health care professionals. As a thriving part of the New England medical community, Southcoast Health offers practice excellence in an environment you want to call home. Southcoast Health is backboned by the Southcoast Physicians Group which has grown to 400+ providers, and we're still growing. This integrated multi-specialty group spans our three hospitals in Southeastern Massachusetts and extends into parts of Rhode Island. We strive to recognize each community's identity while sharing one mission: To care for and improve the health and to promote the wellness of the individuals and communities we serve. We currently have openings in Dermatology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Gastroenterology, Hospitalist, Internal Medicine, Neurology, Obstetrics/Gynecology, and Otolaryngology. to every office of your employer, greatly expanding the geography within which you are restricted from practicing," O'Donnell adds. When evaluating a noncompete agreement, an important factor to consider is your ties to the region. If family obligations, a spouse's employment or education options require you to remain local, a strict restrictive clause could cause your prospects for new employment to dwindle. If you and your loved ones are open to relocating, you may be less affected by the clause. Before you sign: Consider your life over the next three, six or 10 years. W here might you be seeking employment? Mistake #5: Assuming the job is so perfect, you'll never think about leaving You hit the jackpot with your potential new job: ideal location, growth opportunities, impressive salary and benefits. But cu rb your enthusiasm brief ly enough to consider that someday you're likely to change jobs. When that day comes, you'll thank yourself for taking the time now to hash out any post-termination details. One factor is the amount of notice required when announcing your termination. Typically, word of impending job termination is delivered to the employee or employer a set number of days before the targeted departure date. Thirty or 90 days is common. "I've seen notification requirements be as long as 18 months," says Heather Fork, M.D., dermatologist and founder of Doctor's Crossing in Austin, Texas. "That's really too long. Even six months is difficult, as most hiring companies want you to be available sooner." Fork says a notice of 90 days seems ideal. "That's enough time to get your things in order and work with recruiters." Though less common, some contracts don't specify a time requirement. "If there's nothing stated in the contract, it leaves you free to go. It's really up to the individual. That could be o K for some people, as long as you don't

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