PracticeLink Magazine

Winter 2018

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

Issue link: https://magazine.practicelink.com/i/908008

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20 W INTER 2018 PracticeLink.com ▼ T HE Qua L I T Y of L I f E ISS u E D E P A R T M E N T S Career Move Serving the military, civilian style A move to a military base community could mean a higher quality of life — even for civilian physicians. Name: Frank Roam, D. o ., general surgeon Employer: General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri educati ON Undergraduate: University of Missouri, Columbia Postgraduate: A. t . Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine, Kirksville, Missouri Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, is home to a military base. The community is nestled in the heart of the Ozarks about 134 miles southwest of St. Louis on Interstate 44. There's boating, fishing, hunting, hiking and camping for those who wish to pursue outdoor sports. The low cost of living makes it a great place to retire or raise a family — and there are practice opportunities for civilian physicians. What do you like about being a civilian physician at a military hospital? I was able to move back to my hometown, and my family is here. Previously, I was part of a large conglomerate for several years, and there was a lot of micromanagement and inconsistency. It was somewhat of a bureaucracy, so I was ready to leave when I discovered there was an opportunity to come here. There isn't as much pressure here. What's the most challenging part of your role? The practice I have here is a two-edged sword. I'm still busy, but it's a different type of busy. It's more focused on patient-related issues such as surgery, clinical follow-ups, etc. I no longer have the time-consuming collateral duties that a civilian hospital can overwhelm an experienced physician with. I perform a lot of the same types of surgeries, such as hernias, endoscopies, gall bladder, etc. So, there's a trade-off, as there is not as much pathology. The environment is a little more relaxed. Earlier in my career, I would have wanted to be busier and have the variety. Today, my days tend to be over by 4 or 5 p.m. as opposed to 7 or 8 p.m. in my private civilian practice. Depending on the call schedule, it might be much later. If someone wanted to do 60 to 70 major cases a month, the practice I have now might not be what they are looking for. However, I find it very gratifying— especially at this point in my career. Was there anything about practicing as a civilian physician at a military hospital that surprised you? Not really. The physician recruiter was open and honest about what to expect. I was able to speak with some of the other physicians before I actually signed up, so I knew what I was getting into and what the practice was like in the hospital. Where I was previously, I wore a lot of hats. I had to be on a lot of different committees, such as credentialing, infectious diseases, etc. As far as my time was concerned, I had to split it with these meetings and my practice. M a RC ia t R a V el S tea D

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