PracticeLink Magazine

Winter 2018

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

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52 W INTER 2018 PracticeLink.com features to be spent on work," says Kyle Etter, vice president/ partner at Consilium Staffing in Irving, Texas. Consequently, an "integrated lifestyle" is more the possibility than being able to separate work from personal life, according to Angood. Instead of balance, we need to strive for a better blend. Making time for life Cedric "Jamie" Rutland, M.D., a pulmonary and critical care physician with Pacific Pulmonary Medical Group in Riverside, Calif., estimates that he works more than 100 hours a week, including spending one to two nights a week at the hospital. "Work-life balance? I feel like I have it," he says. Work-life balance, he explains, doesn't necessarily mean that you're spending equal time on both. Rutland, who has a wife and two children, may arrive home tired from a long stretch at work, but says, "Being tired is not an excuse for not doing anything" with his children, who are often excited to see him. So he pushes through, gives his family time and attention when he's home, and sleeps when he can. It's a challenge to be both physician and family man, but Rutland feels a personal responsibility to be there when his patients need him. "You take an oath to care for patients," he says, and people get sick 24 hours a day. "If someone gets sick at 5 and my shift is over at 7, I stay," he says. "You have to take care of them." Setting boundaries Jill Garripoli, D. o ., owner and physician at Healthy Kids Pediatrics in Nutley, New Jersey, says that, "Good people go into medicine to help people." Perhaps for that reason, it's so easy to let work consume all your waking hours. Early in her career, Garripoli believed she needed to be at work all the time. Her thinking has shifted in recent years, especially after hearing about a doctor who got an ulcer after working 12-hour days, six days a week. That was a wake-up call. Her typical day involves seeing patients in the morning, taking a lunch break during which she will often run, and then seeing patients in the afternoon and sometimes into the evening. She works five days a week plus alternating Saturdays with her P.A. She'll be at work 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. most days, but only 2 to 5 p.m. on Wednesdays, so she can have a break from patient care in the morning. Garripoli defines work-life balance as having enough time to be a good physician and still have enough time to be with her family. And she's made some changes recently to ensure there is a balance of activities outside of work, starting with "giving myself the freedom to say, 'I don't have to be there 24 hours a day.'" She also surrounded herself with people who help her have a life outside of work. "I found a partner who helps keep me balanced, who forces me to see there is life outside work," she says. She also found a skilled P.A. to share some of the weight of call. Finally, she asked herself, "What makes me happy?," which, she believes, "is a simple thing to do yet no one thinks about it." Having a demanding and stressful career requires an equally relaxing and rejuvenating time away from work in order to achieve balance. So Garripoli tries to set up things she can look forward to and that make her happy outside of work. This could be a weekend getaway or a monthly massage, she offers as examples. They help motivate her during grueling times at work. Shifting focus Balance means something different to each individual, and it can evolve over time. For Khadeja Haye, M.D., national medical director for o B/ g YN Hospitalists for TeamHealth in Atlanta, "Work-life balance is the flexibility to enjoy life outside of medicine. To be there for your family, to be there for personal events, to pursue interests outside of work… while still having the opportunity to take good care of your patients." Haye's outside interests include yoga, cello (which she recently picked up again after having played in high school) and golf (which she played in college). Early on in her career, Haye says that her work-life balance "tipped more toward work." Her focus was on her career and on building a foundation. "It was a conscious choice to work more on my career early on," she says. "I felt fulfilled," she says, and was very comfortable with the decision she made. When she wasn't working, she traveled and spent time with her friends. But now as a wife and mother, Haye has shifted that

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