PracticeLink Magazine

Winter 2018

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

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PracticeLink.com Winter 2018 55 the QUALITY OF LIFE issue The patient comes first at Summit Health, but the organization also focuses on the well-being of the staff and team. Everyone is valued and important. - Joshua Dunkelbarger, MD Summit ENT and Hearing Services Openings for Physicians, Physician Assistants, and Nurse Practitioners! Visit SummitHealth.org/Careers for a complete list. Highly competitive salary Loan repayment Relocation expenses Health, life, and disability insurance Retirement saving with employer match Medical malpractice insurance and tail coverage Generous allowances for CME Join the LEADING HEALTHCARE PROVIDER in South Central Pennsylvania (Franklin County) Contact Tammie Chute | 717-267-7780 tchute@summithealth.org SummitHealth.org/Careers D icke rson , i f you h ave t he opportunity to speak with someone already on staff who is in a similar life stage, since each stage has different needs, and a different definition of balance. The generational shift underway When Garripoli was interviewing for her first job 11 or 12 years ago, her potential boss asked about her vacation expectations. "Oh, we can talk about that later," Garripoli replied, fearing that talking about time off would make her sound like she wasn't willing to work hard. That fear seems to be completely gone with the latest crop of physicians, she observes. "Newer doctors are very forthcoming about what they want," she says, and what they want is work-life balance. Rutland, on the other hand, thinks that discussions about vacation, flex time, and time off shouldn't occur right off the bat. When he interviews a newer physician for an opening and is asked, "How much time do I have to spend at work?" he knows they're not a fit for his particular practice. He recommends staying away from that question altogether. "Medical schools don't teach about business," says Rutland, leading some new physicians to have high salary expectations despite only wanting to work a few hours a week. That is not true of all newer physicians, of course. Many others, facing huge student loan debt, are more likely to do extra work to supplement their income, says Etter, even working during downtime to make some financial headway. Understanding your power Though not all positions can be shaped to fit a physician's personal needs when it comes to work-life balance, many can be. And because of the huge shortage of physicians, it may be possible for organizations to meet specific schedule requests. It depends on the severity of the need and the individual demands being made, Etter explains. For example, if a candidate wants to work three days a week and a client wants them

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