PracticeLink Magazine

Winter 2018

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

Issue link: https://magazine.practicelink.com/i/908008

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56 W INTER 2018 PracticeLink.com features To view open positions in our region visit MAPRAinc.org. Find Mid-Atlantic employers in one place— MAPRAinc.org! If you are looking to practice in a community big or small and enjoy a four season lifestyle, we invite you to explore the Mid-Atlantic! MAPRA is comprised of over 100 in-house recruiters representing individual hospitals and health systems within the Mid-Atlantic Region. Looking for a job in the Mid-Atlantic Region? Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Washington D.C. to work five days, there may be room for compromise. A n go o d e x pl a i n s t h at t he demand for work-life balance reflects a business cycle. Earlier generations had more patient time, less paperwork, and clear delineation between work and personal life. Then, physicians became overworked, saddled with administrative tasks, hit with huge insurance premiums, and accessible to patients at any hour. The industry, and newer physicians, are now reacting to compensate for all this extra work, says Angood. "The workforce is caught in the middle." "The driver needs to be a focus on quality and efficiency of system performance" in order to be able to provide any type of work-life balance, says Angood. Balance through the years W hile establishing a reputation through hard work early on in one's career seems to be a common experience among many newer physicians, that doesn't mean that work will remain the focus forever. Says Rutland, "It's o K if you don't have balance at the beginning of your career. You work your way up the mountain. You can't expect to start at the peak." That climb also allows you to gain experience you might never have had otherwise. Now that Rutland is several years into his career, he acknowledges that his goals are shifting. "My goal isn't to work 137 hours a week for the rest of my life." To that end, he and his wife set five goals for the next 18 months that they work toward together. It helps them remember why he is investing so much time right now at work. At the end of 18 months, the duo sits down again to review their progress and to set new ones. While Garripoli focused heavily on work early in her career, once she was established, she made conscious changes because she recognized she "was losing sight of [her] personal life." Today she is taking steps to delegate more of her workload to her skilled team members. Haye, too, chose to rebalance her life away from work and more toward a personal life, changing jobs in order to achieve a balance that better met her needs and career goals. Toward a more integrated lifestyle We're in a transition phase from the on/off cycle of work to a more integrated lifestyle, says Angood. Haye is witnessing this evolution. "I'm not sure if it's good or bad," she says. Thanks to technology that connects physicians to work and home 24/7, you can take care of personal tasks while at work. That's in the plus column. "But it's bad when you get emails while on vacation," she points out. Haye believes it's up to the individual to manage the amount of access their work life has to their personal. "It's up to the individual to set boundaries and make it less intrusive." Win! Find your next practice— and enter to win a $500 gift card— at PracticeLink.com/Win.

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