PracticeLink Magazine

SUM 2018

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

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42 S UMMER 2018 PracticeLink.com features A recruiter's Google search of Brent Herron, M.D., illuminated the "why" behind his request for an atypical schedule: charity work that made him a great candidate. · Photo by Jamie Rubeis See this issue's physicians in exclusive video interviews at Facebook.com/PracticeLink We will probably Google you After reviewing your C v to confirm that you meet the basic criteria, there's a good chance a recruiter, administrator or physician will turn to Google before inviting you to interview. This isn't an attempt to dig up dirt; employers simply want to connect the dots. We're looking to confirm that you're a promising candidate, and we're crossing our fingers that we don't to see any red flags. At some organizations, an online search is a routine part of the vetting process; at others, they're conducted unofficially. For example, a curious senior partner might look while reviewing C v s on her home laptop. Checking out social media profiles is still a hotly debated practice. Some hospital systems prohibit recruiters from searching anything other than official databases. "Google searches incur the risk that the recruiter will turn up photos or indications of age, gender or country of origin that could be used as grounds for discrimination," explains Christy Bray Ricks, M h A, FASPR, senior director of physician recruitment for LifePoint Health. One of Ricks' former employers prohibited online searches not only to prevent inadvertent exposure to information associated with an equal opportunity protected class, but also because information on social media can present a skewed picture. "There simply isn't a way to forget information about extramarital affairs on a blog. No way to un- see the small town newspaper's lurid and detailed account of a patient death," Ricks says. "That information may not be accurate or relevant to the employment decision, so better to avoid it entirely." Not all organizations play by those rules. Many contend that anything that pops up in a search engine is fair game for review. Whether you agree with the practice or not, the smart thing to do is to prepare to be Googled. Open a browser window in incognito mode, Google yourself and see what pops up. Do a search for every name and nickname that might be associated with you, and don't stop at the first page of entries. Then ask a tech-savvy friend or family member to do the same and see what they can find. Look at your public footprints through the eyes of the senior partners at your previous employers. If you'd be proud to show a photo to those physicians, then it's fine to keep public. Pictures of you with your dog, out with friends, even holding a glass of wine are all great. But no photos, posts or memes about alcohol impairment or recreational drug use should be publicly visible. With the legalization of marijuana in several states, many younger physicians assume it's no big deal to post memes and photos implying recreational use. Not so. Health care employers in Colorado, Oregon and California are worried about adverse selection — individuals who want to move to their states for unlimited legal access to their drug of choice.

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