PracticeLink Magazine

SUM 2018

The career development quarterly for physicians of all specialties, PracticeLink Magazine provides readers with feature articles, compensation stats, helpful job search tips—as well as recruitment ads from organizations across the U.S.

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PracticeLink.com S UMMER 2018 69 the I nterv I ew issue For more information, contact Holly Lestage, Provider Recruitment Manager 508-973-2765 lestageh@southcoast.org More than medicine. Southcoast Health is one of the largest and fastest growing health systems in New England. Since its inception in 1996, Southcoast has become a sought-after destination for health care professionals. As a thriving part of the New England medical community, Southcoast Health offers practice excellence in an environment you want to call home. Southcoast Health is backboned by the Southcoast Physicians Group which has grown to 400+ providers, and we're still growing. This integrated multi-specialty group spans our three hospitals in Southeastern Massachusetts and extends into parts of Rhode Island. We strive to recognize each community's identity while sharing one mission: To care for and improve the health and to promote the wellness of the individuals and communities we serve. We currently have openings in Family Practice, Internal Medicine, Urgent Care, GI, Dermatology, Endocrinology, ID, Neurology, Rheumatology, Pulmonary/Critical Care, Hospitalist, OB/GYN, ENT, and Thoracic Surgery. But that may be unrealistic. Instead of worrying or trying to hide lapses in employment, it's best to address them, according to Kelly Sennholz, M.D., an emergency medicine physician in Denver. "Put it all out on the table, because it will come up," she says. Two or three weeks are insignificant, but any lengthier gaps should be documented and labeled with a neutral or positive descriptor, such as educational travel, cultural pursuits, relocation, etc. Early in her career, Sennholz took time away from medicine to start a company, which she documents on her C v as "time creating a business." "I keep the description simple, so they can't decide if they like or dislike it," she says. "I have answers ready if they ask, and they always do." Be ready to talk about any employment lapse if an interviewer asks. Take the opportunity to present it in a flattering light. "For example, if you traveled to Africa and you toured some medical facilities, perhaps there's a story or vignette you could use [about] what you were learning while traveling," Sennholz suggests. "They're looking for red flags, personal flaws, so don't give them one." Even a less-than-ideal career gap can be presented positively. "It's not a career death sentence," says Zachary Kuhlmann of a gap. "But be prepared to discuss it and how you've grown and how that experience made you better." SCA ttere D w O r K HIS t O r Y? DO n ' t w O rr Y Not every physician follows a straight path from college to practice. Some start in a different area of health care, while others may initially pursue a non-medical career. So don't worry if your work history seems lacking. Instead, put a positive spin on what you've done. Some candidates feel non-medical employment isn't worth mentioning, but that's not always the case. For example, a former school teacher could emphasize teaching, multitasking and time management skills, all of which are useful traits

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