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November 16, 2020

3 common job-search questions from physicians

 

Occupation.

As the new Director of Provider Engagement at PracticeLink, my role is to be available to answer questions, educate, and serve as a valuable resource to both providers and recruiters. Our goal is to help build meaningful relationships that lead to a great experience in finding your first or next practice.

I began my role with PracticeLink in March, 2020. Yes, right in the early stages of the pandemic. So far, my first day was also my last day in the office! I may have had one of the more unusual onboarding experiences in the history of the company.

My knowledge of the physician job-search process has been developed over 25 years of working with physicians and advanced practice providers across numerous hospitals, hospital systems, medical groups and solo practices.

Throughout that time, I’ve noticed these three questions often come up from physicians beginning their search.

Q: I’m not sure where to begin for my job search. Where should I start?

A: Begin by going to FirstPractice.com. Read through the resident and fellow career guide there for information about when to start your search, when and how to build your CV, what to do when you begin to interview, and how to handle the contract stage.

Next, create your CV on PhysicianCV.com, or use the tools at FirstPractice.com and PracticeLink.com to begin applying and responding to the opportunities that interest you most.

Q: Should I use the recommendation letters I used to get into residency for my job search?

A: No, I wouldn’t use recommendation letters from residency. First, in most cases, three or more years have passed since you received those letters. They are likely dated, and you’ve grown in that time. I recommend that you wait until you find an opportunity where there is mutual interest, and then ask the prospective employer representative how they want your references.

Q: I have a great job offer with a good opportunity, and the employer wants an answer by the end of the month. But I have another interview lined up at a different organization, too. What if the second interview leads to a better offer? Can I ask the first employer to wait for me to interview before I decide?

A: This is a very good question, and a tough one to answer. First, the employer with the offer in hand is not obligated to extend their deadline. They may have other people also waiting to interview and are thus in a similar position as you.

On the other hand, they offered you the position first, and they may be willing to wait. It may be as simple as picking up the phone or sending an email and asking for an extension of the decision deadline.

If they can’t grant the extension, then you have a decision to make. I always tell providers that if you can live without that job, and you don’t really care if someone else takes it, then you probably have nothing to lose by interviewing at the second place.



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