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November 1, 2013

What about pay?

Workplace experts and physicians who recently underwent the interview process offer these insights about when and how to approach the tricky subject of compensation:

• "A lot of times it’s good to let the interviewers be your guide and let them drive that subject. If you just bring it up out of the blue, you may be viewed as a little presumptuous or aggressive and this might take away from your standing in the interview process." - Workplace expert Lynn Taylor

• "Definitely don’t bring it up on a first interview. If it happens to come up, I think that’s OK but don’t dwell on it too long. If you start the interview process early enough, eventually the subject will come up at the right time." - Daniel Goodwin, M.D.

• "This is a very complicated issue. I personally always hesitated to bring it up and probably for too long. But I always wanted them to bring up the issue before I discussed it. Certainly the first meeting should be more of a meet-and-greet with no discussion of money unless they bring it up particularly." - Andrew Schimel, M.D.

• "One group was very upfront about compensation and how it would change from year to year. With other groups, by the time I interviewed in person, this was very clearly stated." - Catherine Dodds, M.D.

• "You don’t want to look like it’s all about the money. It’s important to know about the range of what a candidate can live with. Negotiations would happen after the job interview and an offer is made. I would not recommend bringing up salary during the first three questions of the phone interview." - Bobbi Brown, physician recruiter.



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